LIST OF PUBLISHERS

Beall’s List:

Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers

This is a list of questionable, scholarly open-access publishers. We recommend that scholars read the available reviews, assessments and descriptions provided here, and then decide for themselves whether they want to submit articles, serve as editors or on editorial boards.  The criteria for determining predatory publishers are here.

We hope that tenure and promotion committees can also decide for themselves how importantly or not to rate articles published in these journals in the context of their own institutional standards and/or geocultural locus.  We emphasize that journal publishers and journals change in their business and editorial practices over time. This list is kept up-to-date to the best extent possible but may not reflect sudden, unreported, or unknown enhancements.

Last updated April 14, 2014

Appeals: If you are a publisher and would like to appeal your firm’s inclusion on this list, please go here.

237 Responses to LIST OF PUBLISHERS

  1. [...] open access publishers” is well known — in fact, Bell himself maintains an excellent list of such publishers and a helpful set of criteria for recognising [...]

  2. [...] del Colorado, Jeffrey Beall tiene aggiornato l’elenco dei disonesti e lo pubblica sul blog Scholarly Open Access. A noi giornalisti serve a capire come hanno fatto, per esempio, Alberto Carpinteri et al. a [...]

  3. [...] that were known only to them. Given the clear need to deal with this, as illustrated by Jeffrey Beall’s predatory publishing list, I am now going to start listing those who spam me the most. Hopefully we can than remove them all [...]

  4. [...] dal dubbio valore siano esaminati con estrema cura, durante il processo di valutazione.See on scholarlyoa.com Share this:StampaEmailTwitterFacebookLinkedInDiggRedditStumbleUponLike this:Mi piaceBe the first to [...]

  5. [...] shrewd Colorado Librarian has compiled a list of “suspect” open access publishers looking to cash-in on academics’ angst to publish in OA journals.  Some you might be taken [...]

  6. [...] on researchers’ need to publish by setting up low-quality OA journals.  We came across this list of “suspect” OA Publishers, and thought it might be a useful starting point.  If you want any further advice on choosing [...]

  7. [...] over at SV-POW! (part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5).  Finally, I have excluded journals from suspected ‘predatory’ publishers. You can refer to the table below, or download the full spreadsheet [...]

  8. [...] Beall’s List of Predatory Open Access Journals: It’s important to be aware of publishers/journals “that unprofessionally exploit the author-pays model of open access publishing (Gold OA) for their own profit” [...]

  9. [...] ‘predatory’ publishers. According to Jeffrey Beall, who publishes a list of publishers he calls ‘predatory’: “Predatory, open-access publishers are those that [...]

  10. [...] a nutshell, check out the fantastic Jeffrey Beall‘s blog which has a list of dubious publishers best [...]

  11. [...] of “predatory” publishers and questionable open access journals. Beall’s List<http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/&gt; describes “predatory publishers” as using unethical practices such as high author [...]

  12. [...] Jeffrey Beal, in 2 recent articles published in the Scientist and Nature, offers a hard hitting summary of these practices and on his blog draws up an updated list of these ‘predatory publishers‘. [...]

  13. [...] at the University of California has a very active blog discussing the issue. The blog provides a list of questionable journals and so I did a little [...]

  14. [...] If you receive an email asking you to publish, make sure you research that publisher, and verify that their name does not appear on Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers. [...]

  15. [...] Genamics JournalSeek is often good for finding ISSNs. 3. If the journal’s publisher is on Beall’s List: Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers, then I am very unlikely to add it.  There is no hard and fast rule to this, and identifying true [...]

  16. [...] is a big thing now, such that Jeffrey Beall, a librarian at the University of Colorado, maintains a database of predatory open-access journal publishers. I mention this because I have now received about 4 unsolicited e-mails from David Publishing, one [...]

  17. [...] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/  (accessed 8 Dec [...]

  18. [...] or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers’. Yang tertarik sila, lirik daftarnya di sini. Daftar kriteria yang dibuat oleh Beall dalam menentukan penerbit yang masuk ke dalam daftar [...]

  19. [...] a hard working librarian at University of Colorado Denver called Jeffrey Beall who maintains Beall’s List: Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers.  This is a list of questionable, scholarly open-access publishers.  There’s carefully [...]

  20. [...] and do not provide quality control. But scholars already started to collect information about questionable open access publishers. He also talks about the loss of blinded reviews in open peer review. Anonymity gives reviewers [...]

  21. [...] may wish to consult a very useful list of publishers who appear to engage in dubious publication practices, compiled by Jeffrey Beal, a [...]

  22. [...] up a major issue that gets overlooked in many discussions in the open culture movement about how predatory journals are voraciously appropriating the term “open access.” By predatory, I mean [...]

  23. [...] Some of the organizations that are imitating PLoS ONE are doing so more vertically; they are identifying specific domains and inviting authors to submit papers (e.g., “ChemistryOpen” from John Wiley). We can imagine an environment where every discipline or subdiscipline of any size has its own author-pays service. Some of these services will be branded with the name of an established publisher or institution, some will be upstarts, and some will be labelled as “predatory” publishers because of the limitations of their peer-review … [...]

  24. [...] zijn lijsten beschikbaar die dergelijke uitgevers op een rijtje zetten waar je veel voordeel van kunt [...]

  25. [...] Suryansh Publications [...]

  26. [...] a whole website devote to the subject with a list run by Jeffery Beall. While PagePress is not on his official list, they are on his watch [...]

  27. [...] Inside Higher Ed berichtet über das Vorgehen eines Verlags (Canadian Centre for Science and Education) gegen die auch hier schon erwähnte Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers. [...]

  28. [...] sur l’Open Access, les politiques d’OA, les mandats, le plagiat, etc., il tient également une liste de « Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers ». Véritable [...]

  29. [...] a quick post to say that I think Beall’s list of “predatory journals” should be expanded to include dubious subscription access [...]

  30. [...] Beall’s List: Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers: http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ [...]

  31. [...] a quick buck and bringing a bad name to Open Access publishing, see  Beall’s list – http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers. These are enterprising companies or individuals who have realised they can offer quick publication [...]

  32. [...] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ [...]

  33. [...] Beall’s List: Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers [...]

  34. [...] 2009 Philip Davis, uno studente dell’Università Cornell, decise di controllare se un predone dell’open access, Bentham Science Publishers,  praticava la peer-review come dichiarato. [...]

  35. [...] journal is published by CSCanada, which runs 15 journals and is on Jeffrey Beall’s list of “potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly [...]

  36. [...] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ [...]

  37. [...] Jeffrey Beale, a librarian at the University of Colorado, Denver, publishes a list of “Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers“; his blog, Scholarly Open Access, discusses cases. Read a few of the cases and the line [...]

  38. [...] a great solicitation from David Publishing Company, a company on Beall’s list of predatory publishers (I’ve reformatted it so you don’t have to see all the fonts they [...]

  39. [...] “Curious” in the comments) that Dr. Ketchum’s journal/publishing entity is now on Beall’s List of potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access journals. OTL,S! sees several [...]

  40. [...] Journal International [...]

  41. [...] that are vanity publishers. Given that some startup publishers are predatory in nature (see also Beall’s List of Predatory Open Access Journal Publishers), this can be a very useful [...]

  42. [...] “Investigating journals: The dark side of publishing”一文详细介绍了Jeffrey Beall抵制可疑OA出版商的心路历程,以及科学界同行和出版商对此的反应。我在上篇博文中提到Jeffrey Beall的可疑出版商名单,截止到2013年3月21日,已经有315个可能存在问题的OA出版商被列在上面。在Beall看来,“2012 was basically the year of the predatory publisher; that was when they really exploded”。或许,2012年真的是开放获取大发展的一年,也是“掠夺性出版商”大爆发的一年。文章提到不是所有人都认同Beall的做法,比如他判定可以出版商的标准可能过于严格,也有一些人和组织正在尝试建立更可靠的标准来判定正当的出版商。但这提醒我们,如我在之前某篇博文中提到过的,科学家个人,应该掌握一些判断能力来决定是否往某个期刊投稿或加入编委会。 [...]

  43. [...] zur manchmal problematischen Qualität von Open-Access-Verlagen [...]

  44. [...] L’editoria predona è un fatto ben documentato. Per dirla con il Pulitzer, invito il “co-signer” ad approfondire il tema. [...]

  45. [...] are quite a few predatory journals (http://scholarlyoa.com/individual-journals/) and publishers (http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/). Here in Finland, reliable journals and publishers are presumably well covered in the Publication [...]

  46. [...] Denver, in the USA, has, through much research and time, complied a list of publications and a list of publishers to be very wary of.  He’s also explained his criteria for how these have been selected, and [...]

  47. [...] an awful lot of talk about “predatory open access publishers” recently. So much talk that I can’t help wondering whether the phrase is being pushed [...]

  48. [...] an awful lot of talk about “predatory open access publishers” recently. So much talk that I can’t help wondering whether the phrase is being pushed [...]

  49. [...] cuja única      finalidade é lucrar com a publicação de artigos científicos. Veja aqui (http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/)      uma lista elaborada pelo pesquisador Jeffrey [...]

  50. [...] at the University of Colorado in Denver, became so concerned with the trend that he developed Scholarly Open Access, a blacklist of open-access publishers he believes may be engaging in pseudo-academia. He said [...]

  51. [...] with and photo of University of Colorado Denver librarian Jeffrey Beall, compiler of the useful Beall’s List guide to potentially predatory open access scholarly journals and [...]

  52. [...] to Beall because he is doing a huge favor to the research community. His database of “potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers” and the list of “potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access [...]

  53. [...] Tidak gampang memang mengetahui jurnal internasional itu kredibel atau tidak, butuh sedikit usaha dan keinginan kuat menelusuri dan menyelidiki sendiri jurnal-jurnal tersebut, salah satunya mungkin dengan melihat sendiri kualitas paper yang diterbitkan. Tapi sekali lagi susah, apalagi bagi mereka yang baru bergelut dalam penelitian. Untung saja Dr. Beall sudah mendaftarkan sebagian jurnal-jurnal tersebut dan juga mengulas alasan-alasanya, serta orang-orang yang ada dibelakangnya. Anda bisa membaca kriteria-kriteria jurnal palsu menurut Beall di blognya itu. Sebuah blog yang juga dikunjungi oleh banyak ilmuwan dan editor jurnal. Ada diskusi yang hidup pula di bagian komentarnya. Untuk teman-teman dosen bisa mengecek daftar mutakhir nama-nama publisher yang dianggap abal abal ini di sini. [...]

  54. [...] of course, but as costs of administrative expenses and the like. Librarian Jeffrey Beall  lists publishers and journals that seem to be blatantly dishonest, for example in claiming to use peer review while [...]

  55. [...] Publishers By Journal titles View the criteria for inclusion in the list (highly recommended [...]

  56. [...] of questionable quality. For more about predatory open access journals, see Jeffrey Beall’s List of Potential, Possible, or Probable Predatory Scholarly Open-Access Publishers.  Unfortunately, by having shady practices, these journals put the reputation of open access more [...]

  57. [...] but the scientist or group publishing the paper must pay to be published, thus the term “predatory journal“. Likewise with conferences, described as [...]

  58. [...] Bila karya ilmiah tidak ditemukan disalah satu laman tersebut maka akan di periksa di laman scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ dan scholarlyoa.com/individual-journals yang memberikan informasi tentang publisher dan [...]

  59. [...] then there’s Landes Bioscience. It isn’t listed by Beall among “Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers”, but it came to my attention because I received a notice from Oncoimmunology announcing their [...]

  60. [...] ma sono una più sberluccicante dell’altra e tutte dai titoli talmente credibili che l’editore non è nemmeno nella lista di Beall. [...]

  61. [...] that keeps up with Open Access issues, particularly ferreting out predatory journal publishers. His list of potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers is very helpful if academic faculty or graduate students are solicited for manuscripts from [...]

  62. [...] publishers are an increasingly prevalent problem. Jeffrey Beall’s list is getting a lot of coverage recently, including stories in Nature and in the New York [...]

  63. [...] zur manchmal problematischen Qualität von Open-Access-Verlagen [...]

  64. […] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  65. […] to the question of Where can I verify if this is a spam? Access the full list here: http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ If  you see the name here, be cautious and keep an open mind! Click here to find out how Jeffrey […]

  66. […] to critics such as Jeffrey Beall, a University of Colorado, Denver, librarian who keeps a list of so-called predatory publishers. Now, the U.S. government has jumped in as an enforcer, warning […]

  67. […] to critics such as Jeffrey Beall, a University of Colorado, Denver, librarian who keeps a list of so-called predatory publishers. Now, the U.S. government has jumped in as an enforcer, warning […]

  68. […] blog and the list, which is known to librarians and professors simply as “Beall’s List,” has led to Mr. Beall’s being featured in The New York Times, Nature, and The Chronicle. The […]

  69. […] A recent technology blog entry (New, Jake. 2013. “Publisher Threatens to Sue Blogger for $1-Billion” Chronicle of Higher Education) signals that librarian Jeff Beall has recently been threatened with a $1B lawsuit by the online publisher OMICS: “On his blog, Mr. Beall accuses OMICS of spamming scholars with invitations to publish, quickly accepting their papers, then charging them a nearly $3,000 publishing fee after a paper has been accepted.” Beall maintains a list of “predatory publishers” at http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  70. […] blog and the list, which is known to librarians and professors simply as “Beall’s List,” has led to Mr. Beall’s being featured in The New York Times, Nature, and The Chronicle. The […]

  71. […] one isn’t very familiar with OA journals, then one needs to be cautious about selecting one. For authors in the biomedical area, it’s preferable that the journal be […]

  72. […] if you attempt to find out more, very soon you will find yourself looking at Beall’s List of Predatory, Open-Access Publishers, a sardonic, highly informative guide to a particular sort of publishing scam.  The author of the […]

  73. […] In the past, a aggregation denomination that was unknown to a scientist would be an semiautomatic red-flag for aggregation calibre – if I haven’t heard of it, it staleness not be rattling good. As the sort of aggregation titles increases exponentially (Larsen and von Ins, 2010), scholars hit overturned to a panoramic disagreement of tools to support removed calibre publications from the rest. Journal poetics same the effect bourgeois (Garfield, 2006) and a journal’s h-index hit been utilised (and mis-used) extensively.  And in past years, professional Jeffery Beall has place unitedly a itemize of the poorest journals of all, so-called “predatory publishers.” […]

  74. […] of late about “predatory” publishers and there is a list of these publishers here and an article to start with here.  If you aren’t sure about the reputation of an OA […]

  75. […] LIST OF PUBLISHERS […]

  76. […] one isn’t very familiar with OA journals, then one needs to be cautious about selecting one. For authors in the biomedical area, it’s preferable that the journal be […]

  77. […] you against predatory publishers kevinmd.com/blog/2013/05/l… Sobre los falsos editores de #OA scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ — José A. Merlo Vega (@merlovega) May 2, […]

  78. […] Impact Factors and other bibliometric tools, and what to look out for to avoid publishing with a predatory publisher. We can also provide advice on how to ensure that the work of our researchers is both discoverable, […]

  79. […] terindex Scopus/Thomson-ISI namun masuk dalam daftar publisher Questionable Journal/Publisher di http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/, apakah artikel tersebut TIDAK DIAKUI dalam penilaian angka kreditnya atau gradenya diturunkan […]

  80. […] strategies introduced to help identify Open Access publishers of questionable reputation e.g. using Beall’s List of Predatory publishers . Information gained from this session will help to inform and enhance our Research Impact Analysis […]

  81. Field Notes says:

    […] first issue earlier this year. The issue looked thin, the editorial board sketchy, so I checked out Beall’s List of predatory open access publishers. Sure enough: SMC‘s publisher, RedFame, is on the list. […]

  82. […] On my wanderings across the internet I came across Jeffrey Beall’s site ‘Scholarly Open Access‘.  His site is a fantastic resource for suspected academic journals and the publishers that produce them.  The journals that are listed are nothing more than cash cows for catching unwary researchers by charging them to publish their own articles in journals that are not properly edited or peer-reviewed.  This is often a trap that PhD and Post-Doctoral students can fall into as they aim to publish their research to gain academic credit and traction to starting an academic career.  However it is well noted that established academic researchers and lecturers often collude, willingly or unwillingly and sometimes unknowingly, by serving as editors on the journal boards.  Ben Goldacre, in his 2012 book ‘Bad Pharma: How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients‘, mentions the damage that this can do to scientific research and to human health.  It is a serious problem in the academic world that has real world effects in the application of scientific research and results.  The criteria by which Beall determines predatory open access publishers can be found here and the full list of potential, possible or predatory scholarly open access journals and publishers themselves can be accessed here. […]

  83. […] Domain è fra gli editori sconsigliati da Jeffrey Beale, ça va sans dire, ma consigliati a Carpinteri, Celani, Mastromattei et al. in […]

  84. […] are started everyday hoping to make some money during the open access boom. This can even lead to predatory publishing, a term coined by Jeffrey Beall, a activist librarian trying to keep process of […]

  85. […] have been made aware of Jeffrey Beall’s excellent list of “potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers.”  As […]

  86. […] at the University of Colorado, Denver, the Open-Acces movement has inadvertently given rise to a legion of ‘predatory publishers’. The publishers offer (for a hefty fee) to publish research papers without the process of rigorous […]

  87. […] Jeffrey Beall’s list of possibly predatory scholarly open-access publishers (as heard about on On the Media… again). Bookmarking it for myself, sharing. I suspect public admin/policy might be even more vulnerable than many fields for inadvertently mixing together reputable and, well, less-high-quality sources since we’re frequently pulling together information from multiple fields (some with less familiar publishing landscapes than others). […]

  88. […] journal, by checking opinions and reputation. As a first step, it is a good idea to look through the list of predatory OA publishers, which is compiled by Dr. Beall. Another good tip when choosing a journal may be to use the new […]

  89. […] has made this task easier by maintaining a list of predatory open-access journals and their publishers. It’s an extensive list and regularly […]

  90. […] Beall, a librarian at the University of Colorado at Denver, is tracking the problem, and keeps a list of Potential, Possible, or Probable Predatory Scholarly Open-Access Publishers. You’ll notice that our suspect journal, Studies in Literature and Language, meets many of […]

  91. […] Colorado librarian has compiled a blacklist of suspicious journal publishers, self-titled ‘Beall’s List’. This growing list currently exposes over 400 dubious Open Access publishers with poor ethical, […]

  92. […] answering but also frankly because I have a lot of respect for Jeffrey and the work he does with Beal’s List. I think the post raises some interesting questions about the usefulness – or lack thereof […]

  93. […] Denver — who maintains a celebrated scholarly publishing “hall of shame,” the list of predatory open access publishers and journals and blogs regularly at scholarlyoa.com — about the inherent vulnerability of gold open access […]

  94. […] of Colorado, Denver — who maintains a celebrated scholarly publishing “hall of shame,” the list of predatory open access publishers and journals and blogs regularly at scholarlyoa.com — about the inherent vulnerability of gold open access […]

  95. […] Donc avant de soumettre un article dans une revue, allez jeter un œil sur cette liste de revues prédatrices. […]

  96. […] and Head & Neck Surgery are on Jeffrey Beal’s list of predatory publishers (click here). To put it bluntly the authors fell for the modern version of the Nigerian “send us $500 to […]

  97. […] List of “Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers” (http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/). These are publishers/journals who, Beall claims, use suspect practices to attract authors and […]

  98. […] Colorado librarian has compiled a blacklist of suspicious journal publishers, self-titled ‘Beall’s List’. This growing list currently exposes over 400 dubious Open Access publishers with poor ethical, […]

  99. […] models. Pieta Eklund wrote a guide how to identify the better ones, and Jeffrey Beall maintains a list of predatory publishers. The situation is far bleaker with conferences, and their calls make up the […]

  100. […] Beall’s list aims to keep academic authors informed about publishers and journals to avoid. The Scholarly Open Access blog maintains the list and is upfront about its criteria for labeling a publisher “predatory.” […]

  101. […] World Applied Sciences Journal are indexed in Scopus and Web of Knowledge. IDOSI is one of the predatory scholarly open-access journals identified by Jeffrey Beall A librarian from UC […]

  102. […] who exploit the ‘author-pays’ model. A Colorado Librarian, Jeffrey Beall, has compiled a blacklist of these suspicious journal publishers. Beall has since flagged another threat authors need to […]

  103. Hilarious says:

    […] list of the publishers, which he calls “Potential, possible, or probable predatory publishers” (http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ and http://scholarlyoa.com/2012/12/06/bealls-list-of-predatory-publishers-2013/#more-1036 […]

  104. […] are crowdsourcing the authorship of a manuscript which we intend to publish in this Predatory Journal.  Everybody who pitches in may list themselves in the acknowledgments. Our goal is for the paper […]

  105. […] List of Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers listing Academic […]

  106. […] who exploit the ‘author-pays’ model. A Colorado Librarian, Jeffrey Beall, has compiled a blacklist of these suspicious journal publishers. Beall has since flagged another threat authors need to keep […]

  107. […] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  108. […] are not familiar with the big-name journals.  But for starters, Scholarly Open Access maintains an excellent list of sketchy publishers (sadly, quite long) here – and also their criteria for inclusion.   These journals got bad […]

  109. […] DIKTI menggunakan banyak acuan dalam menilai kualitas jurnal, diantaranya Jeffreay Beall (http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/), scimagojr (http://www.scimagojr.com/), dan microsoft academic research […]

  110. […] Someone call Jeffrey Beall. And read the rest of Epstein’s […]

  111. […] list of predatory publishers (http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/) […]

  112. […] possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access journals. Through his well-known blog, Beall’s List, he encourages all scholars to increase scrutiny of publishers of their research. This webinar will […]

  113. […] possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access journals. Through his well-known blog, Beall’s List, he encourages all scholars to increase scrutiny of publishers of their research. This webinar will […]

  114. […] then combed the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and Jeffrey Beall’s list of possible predatory publishers, using various […]

  115. […] to me was when he compared those accepting journals against Beall’s predatory journal list. Jeff Beall helps collate a list of predatory Open Access journals, which at least saves us from having to do […]

  116. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  117. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  118. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  119. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  120. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  121. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  122. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  123. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  124. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  125. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  126. […] (a closed-access publisher) does a “sting” on crappy OA journals (and boy are there lots of these), and Michael Eisen points out how this sting is more about how crappy peer review is at catching […]

  127. […] the results show that neither the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), nor Beall’s List  are accurate in detecting which journals are likely to provide peer review. In spite of an […]

  128. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls "predatory publishers" – those who "exploit the open-access model of publishing […]

  129. […] from Jeffrey Beall, librarian at University of Colorado, Denver. He also lists predatory publishers here. Jeffrey also mentions the upcoming Science […]

  130. […] Beall, a library scientist at the University of Colorado, Denver, who names and shames a list of “predatory” publishers on his website. He said that predatory open access publishers “exploded” last year and numbers […]

  131. […] Bohannon’s submission of over 300 bogus papers to open access journals listed in the DOAJ and on Beall’s list of “predatory open access publishers”. Problematically, 157 of those journals accepted the […]

  132. […] Beall, a library scientist at the University of Colorado, Denver, who names and shames a list of “predatory” publishers on his website. He said that predatory open access publishers “exploded” last year and numbers […]

  133. […] Beall, a library scientist at the University of Colorado, Denver, who names and shames a list of “predatory” publishers on his website. He said that predatory open access publishers “exploded” last year and numbers […]

  134. […] Beall’s list is good (a lot of predatory publishers from Beall’s list accepted the flawed articles) […]

  135. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  136. […] publish their articles. To warn potential authors of this scam, Librarian Jeffrey Beall maintains a list of more than 150 of these predatory companies, each with multiple journals, which have eerily […]

  137. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  138. […] Jeffrey Beal has been warning about these predatory publishers for some time now and keeps a list of to assist in avoiding them.  Read more here from […]

  139. […] So this article linked below is a great followup to my posts She Blinded Me With Science – or, 4 Tips for Critical Reading for the Internet Age and  How to Read a Scientific Paper or Journal Article – it describes a wonderful yet somewhat depressing “sting operation” on shady journals.  It certainly will help refresh the great list maintained at Scholarly Open Access… […]

  140. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  141. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  142. […] The paper can be freely accessed and downloaded: Who’s Afraid of Peer Review? Ever so subtly, open access journals are madeto look like the villains in the story. The only problem being that only open access journals were tested, so there is no possible comparison. That does no mean that there aren’t oa journals that are basically scams, many of them linked to "predatory publishers" as defined by Jeffrey Beal, who is cited in the article, but without links to Beal’s list. […]

  143. […] The paper can be freely accessed and downloaded: Who’s Afraid of Peer Review? Ever so subtly, open access journals are madeto look like the villains in the story. The only problem being that only open access journals were tested, so there is no possible comparison. That does no mean that there aren’t oa journals that are basically scams, many of them linked to "predatory publishers" as defined by Jeffrey Beal, who is cited in the article, but without links to Beal’s list. […]

  144. […] a investigate librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit a open-access […]

  145. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  146. […] aufnehmen. Bohannon wählte für sein Experiment 304 Journals aus, 121 stammten aus der Liste von Beall, 167 aus DOAJ. 15 waren bei beiden vertreten. Dann schrieb der promovierte Molekularbiologe ein […]

  147. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  148. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  149. […] help sort the wheat from the chaff, a librarian named Jeffery Beall has created a list of journals and publishers suspected of being "predatory". While Beall's list is not without its flaws, it is an admirable undertaking that serves a valuable […]

  150. […] article comes in the “World Journal of Neuroscience” (WJNS), the same fake “peer-review” journal, where also Valkee has put it’s stuff before – for some 500 […]

  151. […] a research librarian, is a self-appointed watchdog over open-access publishing. He maintains a list of what he calls “predatory publishers” – those who “exploit the open-access […]

  152. […] who read the whole paper will see that a scant 18% of the journals listed on one of the resources, Beall’s list of likely predatory OA journals, rejected the paper, – good news for those who rely on that list as an aid to screen out […]

  153. […] access journals sampled from the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and Larry Beall’s infamous list. The lichen species, secondary metabolite, and cancer cell line were varied randomly to generate […]

  154. […] scientist at Lund University in Sweden, which aims to list credible scientific journals, and a list compiled by Jeffrey Beal, library scientist at the University of Colorado, with the objective of […]

  155. […] publications) and had a bias in OA journal selection. Yes there are lists of OA journals to avoid (http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/) but here are some responses to the contentious Science […]

  156. […] and the reporting of the data. There have always been vanity publishers and Jeffrey Beall has a list of these here. It is obvious that you can get anything published through a vanity publisher and that any test of […]

  157. […] La maggior parte di queste erano riviste già note per essere poco affidabili (comparivano nella blacklist curata dal prof. Jeffrey Beall), ma anche riviste più dignitose hanno abboccato allo scherzetto di […]

  158. […] a 305 revistas y fue aceptado por más de la mitad. La mayoría eran revistas de editoriales “depredadoras” (cobran por publicar en acceso abierto pero no realizan ninguna evaluación) pero también […]

  159. […] se han confeccionado listas de potenciales “editoriales depredadoras” como ésta (Beall’s list). Así que muchas “revistas falsas” o “sacacuartos” publican en acceso […]

  160. […] “Similarly, the results show that neither the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), nor Beall’s List  are accurate in detecting which journals are likely to provide peer review. In spite of an […]

  161. […] dass es zweitens immer mehr Verlage gibt, deren Geschäftsmodell grenzwertig erscheint (vgl. Beall’s list) bzw. dass drittens die Qualität des Peer Reviews gerade von Open-Access-Journals […]

  162. […] Jeffrey Beall de kendi sitesinde yağmacı, “at cebe”ci dediği yayıncıların sonu gelmez listesini […]

  163. […] are new and still have to build their reputation – but nonetheless necessary. Efforts like Beall’s List of questionable, scholarly open-access publishers and journals can help to avoid low quality publications. However, they are of little help when one […]

  164. […] that help us navigate the Open Access world are the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and Jeffrey Beall’s List of predatory publishers. DOAJ is a list of OA journals that meet certain selection criteria […]

  165. […] should all be cautious when wanting to publish results in an open access online journal. Here is a list of these problematic […]

  166. […] repute, who do not engage in rigorous peer review, and whose output cannot be considered scholarly. Beall’s List is currently the most comprehensive listing of predatory, or potentially predatory publishers, and […]

  167. […] Beall’s List of predatory publishers (definition here). You can find the list of publishers here. As can be seen, Synergy Publishers are included on that […]

  168. […] the high level of acceptance is unsurprising because nearly half of the publishers were listed on Beall’s List of predatory publishers. That would be persuasive if the vast majority of the acceptances were from Beall’s List alone, […]

  169. […] sponsorizzata dall’azienda. Il terzo – sull’American Journal of Immunology di un editore predone – spiegherebbe l’effetto del GMaf su neuroni in vitro. Ma non lo paragona con quello prodotto […]

  170. […] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  171. […] of traditional publishing make all the time, and it is not without merit. The flip side of the “predatory publishers” that Jeffrey Beall has brought to our attention could be said to be the […]

  172. […] その一方で、近ごろ問題視されるようになっているのは、OA出版のための費用負担として著者から支払われる Article Publication Charge (= APC, 論文出版料金)を目当てに、適切な査読手続きを欠くなど質の低いOA誌を発行する出版社の増加です。悪質な出版社をまとめたブラックリストBeall’s Listが公開されているほか、最近では、Science誌のライターが、明らかな科学的誤りをわざと随所に入れたニセ論文をOA誌に投稿する「おとり実験」を行ったところ、投稿先の304誌のうち実に157誌からアクセプトされたという報告が大きな話題となりました。 […]

  173. […] nel 2002 e dall’azienda nel 2008. La terza pubblicazione, comprata da un prestigioso predone dell’open access, dimostra l’effetto terapeutico del GcMaf su neuroni in vitro e quindi […]

  174. […] på något social nätverk? Hittar du forskaren på heminstitutionens hemsida? Finns förlaget i Beall’s list of Predatory Open-Access Publishers? Vad skrivs om refereegranskning på tidskriftens hemsida? Hur snabb är deras […]

  175. […] social media sites? Can you find the researcher’s home institution? Can you find the publisher on Beall’s list of Predatory Open Access Publishers? What information can be found in the journal regarding the peer review process? How quick is their […]

  176. […] Indiana University, and Jeffrey Beall, a librarian at the University of Colorado, Denver, known for Beall’s List of questionable publishers, teamed up for the article. As they write in their […]

  177. […] Meanwhile, the editors have republished the journal’s contents on another site, which is perfectly legal given the Creative Commons license that governs copyright — but probably also means there won’t be any expressions of concern on those versions. There is, however, at least one correction on that site, which is published by a company on Jeffrey Beall’s list of possible predatory publishers. […]

  178. […] Meanwhile, the editors have republished the journal’s contents on another site, which is perfectly legal given the Creative Commons license that governs copyright — but probably also means there won’t be any expressions of concern on those versions. There is, however, at least one correction on that site, which is published by a company on Jeffrey Beall’s list of possible predatory publishers. […]

  179. […] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  180. […] Bila karya ilmiah tidak ditemukan disalah satu laman tersebut maka akan di periksa di laman scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ dan scholarlyoa.com/individual-journals yang memberikan informasi tentang publisher dan […]

  181. […] included 122 journals listed at the time on Jeffery Beall’s list of predatory publishers (http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/). Beall’s list has been criticized in its own right (generally for being too inclusive); but […]

  182. […] EU gjør programmet Horizon 2020 OA obligatorisk Predatory publishers – publiserer alt. Jf Bealls liste. Open data, dekkes av egen cc lisens […]

  183. […] Bila karya ilmiah tidak ditemukan disalah satu laman tersebut maka akan di periksa di laman scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ dan scholarlyoa.com/individual-journals yang memberikan informasi tentang publisher dan […]

  184. […] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  185. […] In my case I did some more digging and looked at Jeffrey Beall’s list of predatory journals. This journal wasn’t on there. So I checked the publisher (David Publishing) on his list of […]

  186. […] et surfent sur la vague du libre accès. Une liste de ce type d’éditeurs est disponible ici et régulièrement mise à […]

  187. […] the leaders of the group. For a group of people, the voice of OA was Jeffrey Beall, well known for Beall’s List of predatory OA publishers. (Yes, it always had his name in it – important marketing […]

  188. […] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  189. […] University of Colorado, Denver, and he maintains an exhaustive list of questionable journals and publishers. This list is well-referenced, constantly updated, and commonly referred to to check for dubious […]

  190. […] J. Beall’ın kara listesi […]

  191. […] of Geosciences, of Scientific Research Publishing (scirp) named as a predatory publisher by Beall’s list. I have tried to download this to have a laff, but have been hit three times by a network […]

  192. […] that the journal is not listed in Jeffrey Beall’s List of predatory Publishers at the University of Colorado in […]

  193. […] Jeffrey Beall, a librarian at the University of Colorado – Denver, has put together a useful list that is continually updated: “Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers.” It’s worth consulting when you see a CFP just to educate yourself on any possibilities – and to inquire further yourself if necessary. Remember to not necessarily search for the name of the journal, but for the publisher name. http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  194. […] Beall’s List: Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers […]

  195. […] If you have research or a conference proposal, be careful who you send it to. Do your research first before submitting for publication. Be sure to check your list of your hopeful OA publishers with a librarian to make sure they are reputable. Or you can look to see if they are on a list of dubious OA publishers by visiting the link below. And of course, be sure to check back here at the UD libraries’ blog for more details about OA publishing news. http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers […]

  196. […] Jeffrey Beall’s list is at http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  197. […] LIST OF PUBLISHERS […]

  198. […] This publisher is included on my list of predatory publishers here. […]

  199. […] Ndryshe, m-hikari dhe scirp.org janë revista të listuara si false në një web faqe të quajtur:http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/. […]

  200. […] Ndryshe, m-hikari dhe scirp.org janë revista të listuara si false në një web faqe të quajtur:http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/. […]

  201. […] Ndryshe, m-hikari dhe scirp.org janë revista të listuara si false në një web faqe të quajtur: http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/. […]

  202. […] thrown in — offer peer-reviewed publication for a hefty fee.  Many of these  ”predatory open access journals,” while using the names of eminent scholars and institutions, emanate from fake addresses, […]

  203. […] emerged among the serious brands in the space, offering their own prestige. Many others have been labeled predatory for charging researchers for the privilege of publication, among other questionable […]

  204. […] emerged among the serious brands in the space, offering their own prestige. Many others have been labeled predatory for charging researchers for the privilege of publication, among other questionable […]

  205. […] emerged among the serious brands in the space, offering their own prestige. Many others have been labeled predatory for charging researchers for the privilege of publication, among other questionable […]

  206. […] Open Access   pateikiantis informaciją apie nesąžiningus akademinius leidėjus. Ilgame Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers sąraše galite pasitikrinti, gal ant atvirosios prieigos bangos „atplaukė“ apsišaukėlis, […]

  207. […] which are predatory, meaning, it seeks to exploit or oppress others. Beal provides a comprehensive list of these questionable journals. It will always help if you read some reviews before spending your valuable time on those listed, […]

  208. […] issue, Beall shares his experience and advice through his weblog including a list of publishers http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ and a list of standalone journals […]

  209. […] a list of journals, but highly suspicious Open Access publishers, is Beall’s list. Most of the resources listed in this post include journals uncritically. Beall’s list is a […]

  210. […] one anthropologist, detailed here. Before submitting to a less-well known open-access journal, this list of potentially predatory publishers is definitely worth checking, particularly if a fee is […]

  211. […] It appears to have taken corrective measures, has been removed from a widely-read blacklist, and does appear ina directory of nearly 10,000 open-access journals that claims to assesses […]

  212. […] For more information on why open-access publications will continue to be the most important souce of information that might otherwise be academically suppressed, see:  Why I Started Publishing In Open-Access Journals, And Why You Should Too See also: Accelerating Science Awards Program: The video features six teams of scientists whose innovative reuse of existing research enabled important advances in medical treatment and detection, ecology and science education. One of the teams focuses on malaria. This is a list of questionable, scholarly open-access publishers […]

  213. […] Science and Engineering Vol:7 No:12, 2013). Dit tijdschrift is van een uitgever die op Beall’s list voorkomt, een lijst met dubieuze open Access uitgevers. Niet zo vertrouwenwekkend […]

  214. […] Des petits plaisantins ont surfé sur le succès de ces journaux et ont lancé des "journaux prédateurs". En gros, vous demandez aux gens de payer pour publier leurs articles, et vous le faites. Il […]

  215. […] In open access, the author pays the journal. The journal notionally uses the money to ensure good quality refereeing, and to actually publish the work. But the big problem is the direct link between income and number of papers published. There is a big and immediate incentive to publish a lot of papers. Being more selective and trying to build reputation is perhaps a better long-term strategy, but from the author’s point of view it becomes a major exercise to determine whether an open access publisher is worth publishing with or really just a vanity press. Of course, your first point of call must be here, Beall’s List. […]

  216. […] hoax papers, which have tried to raise awareness of pseudo-academia, such as spamferences and predatory publishers. Most recently, Science reported on a massive ‘sting’ operation which used computer-generated […]

  217. […] impact factor called World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, which is listed as a potential predatory publisher, publishing hoaxes and poorly peer reviewed or non-reviewed […]

  218. […] Gdy przychodzi Wam do głowy wysłać coś do nowego obiecującego czasopisma OA, warto zerknąć czy przypadkiem nie jest jednym z Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers […]

  219. […] hoax papers, which have tried to raise awareness of pseudo-academia, such as spamferences and predatory publishers. Most recently, Science reported on a massive ‘sting’ operation which used computer-generated […]

  220. […] américain, Jeffrey Beall, a conçu le blog Scholarly Open Access où il établit une liste des revues “prédatrices”. Mise à jour très régulièrement, celle-ci recense actuellement plusieurs centaines de revues […]

  221. […] 304 journals were not just randomly drawn: Bohannon got them from two sources. One was Beall’s List, published by Jeffrey Beall, a library scientist at the University of Colorado-Denver. Today it […]

  222. […] line on a CV.  But many of these have poor editorial control and may even lack peer review (see here for a list of questionable publishers, and here for stand-alone journals).  We use largely […]

  223. […] is not lost; we have a more general resource to help us. Jeffrey Beall at UC Denver keeps a running log of predatory publishers. Macrothink, the originators of this email, are listed on Jeffrey Beal’s blacklist. I have copied […]

  224. […] contrasta con tutti gli altri test realizzati fino ad oggi e pubblicato su una rivista considerata inattendibile) dovrebbero captare le frequenze emanate dal virus dell’epatite […]

  225. […] Beall’s List: Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers […]

  226. […] sans les faire expertiser par des scientifiques. Ces éditeurs font même l’objet d’une liste noire disponible en […]

  227. […] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  228. […] Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers – The dark side of the opening of the academic world, I keep getting contacted by dodgy-looking publications, so this list looks like a great resource. […]

  229. […] identify a fake journal? The first stop should be Prof. Beall’s blog where exhaustive lists (http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ andhttp://scholarlyoa.com/individual-journals/) of counterfeits have been listed out. The lists […]

  230. […] in de commentaren opgemerkt, staat deze uitgeverij inmiddels op Beall’s list van Open Acces uitgevers en tijdschriften waaraan een luchtje […]

  231. […] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  232. […] Colorado librarian Jeffrey Beall has compiled a valuable list of dubious and predatory publishers (http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers) – those who prey upon academics who face more and more pressure from their administrations to […]

  233. […] based on several criteria: the reputability of the publisher (from Beall’s List of Publishers, http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers); the associated bodies of work by its contributors; and whether they are recognized subject matter […]

  234. […] interest or desire to promote authentic scientific communication.  The predatory journals on Beall’s list, in the curator’s opinion, practice a corruption of the open access model, having authors pay […]

  235. […] http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ […]

  236. […] is the blacklist of suspicious journal publishers published by a Colorado librarian and self-titled ‘Beall’s List’. This growing list currently exposes over 400 dubious Open Access publishers with poor ethical, […]

  237. Open Science says:

    […] after John Bohannon’s “sting”. Moreover one of this publishers is also mentioned on Jeffrey Beal list. Directory of Open Access Journals includes both of this questionable companies. Please be careful […]

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