Need Help Finding a Good Journal for Your Next Paper? Try These Resources

One of the most frequently-asked questions I receive is for information on how to find good journals to publish in. Here are three useful, online resources that provide journal suggestions or recommendations to researchers.

 First of all, the best way to become familiar with the top journals in your field is to

  1. Read many articles in your area of study and take note of where the best ones are published
  2. Consult with senior colleagues in your department
  3. Consult with an academic librarian

If you still need some ideas, here are three four free, automated services that might prove helpful:

Edanz

Edanz Journal Selector

1. Edanz Journal Selector. Edanz is a Hong Kong-based company that provides fee-based services to authors such as copyediting and letter writing. One of its services is a journal finder, and I find that this service is currently free on their website. Among the three services described here, this one appears to have the broadest coverage. The company also appears to have a fee-based journal finding service, but I cannot tell how it differs from this free one.

 

Elsevier Journal Finder

Elsevier Journal Finder

2. Elsevier Journal Finder. If you are suspecting that this product only includes Elsevier journals in its database, you’re right, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Elsevier publishes over 2,000 top journals in many scholarly fields. This service does allow users to limit search results to open-access journals. The results screen the Elsevier Journal Finder is helpful and provides in-depth journal information such as impact factor, editorial times, acceptance rates, and production times.

 

Journal Article Name Estimator

Journal Article Name Estimator

3. Journal Article Name Estimator (Jane). This service originates in the Netherlands. It is limited to journals included in Medline, a database published by the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Thus, it’s limited to biomedical sciences journals. This one offers an alternative search method to entering your article’s title and abstract — you can enter keywords in a simple search box.

But many library catalogs also offer this keyword functionality, so if you’re unsuccessful at all the above methods, try entering keywords in your library online catalog, limiting the search results to scholarly journals.

Update, July 7, 2014:

I regret forgetting to include JournalGuide, a new service that matches those described here.

Also, the difference between Edanz’s free and for-fee journal finding services is described here.

20 Responses to Need Help Finding a Good Journal for Your Next Paper? Try These Resources

  1. Yurii says:

    A shameless plug. Here is another tool deployed by Editage.
    http://www.editage.com/puma
    This tool uses an abstract to match an article to a set of journals based on journal quality criteria.

  2. Farid says:

    Dear Mr Beall

    I have done a search on Elsevier journal finder and found the following journal

    Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences

    Do you believe this is good journal?

    Farid

    • MK says:

      Procedia is actually the proceedings of a particular conference – if you host a conference with submitted papers, you can have your own volume of Procedia. I’m not sure if it’s on all the volumes, but on at least some there is a statement from Elsevier to the effect that they are not responsible for and peer review processes involved in selecting papers (or indeed, if there is any peer review process at all).

    • No, but as the other commenter has already stated, it’s not really a journal so much as it is a conference proceeding. I do receive many inquiries about the 20 Procedia titles.

  3. […] Jeffrey Beall gives overviews of three resources that can assist in finding good journals to publish in at his blog Scholarly Open Access. […]

  4. tekija says:

    I pasted the abstract of the lapset submitted paper in all four systems, including the one in comments. This is a five-country multicenter study on a particular type of cancer.

    Edanz performed modreately well. The four top suggestions labeled in green included two of the four first choices that we discussed before submitting our manuscript. Thereafter the quality deteriorated rapidly. However it only considered one subspecialty in the Main suggestions. I give this two stars.

    Elseviers system was a great disappointment, it was essentially worthless. The top ten suggestions included none of our four first choice candidates although one of them was an Elsevier journal. Only two of the ten would have been even possible, albeit with a far lower impact factor. The rest were cancer journals dedicated to other body parts that would never have considered publishing our paper. And one of the two possible ones was an Egyptian journal without impact factor that would have however accepted 60 percent of manuscripts. No stars!

    Jane was surprisinly good. It also came up with two of our actual choices and moreover proposed top journals in two other fields that certainly could be considered for this manuscript depending whom you see as your main audience. Only one of top ten suggestions was unacceptable. Four stars, this one could think out of the box.

    Editage was also reasonable. It picked one of our four choices but it was not on the top. It also identified the two other disciplines and actually proposed these as first options. A few options were clear misses. Two stars, because no impact factors, you would need to look these up separately.

    These latter two tools based on this trial might be useful for suggesting possibilities accross disciplines in initial stages of choosing the forum for a multidisciplinary publication but in the end you will need a specialist in that discipline to suggest the final choice if it is not your own area of expertice.

  5. Dyana says:

    very very good information….*****

  6. In add two more service:
    1. American journals Experts:
    http://www.aje.com
    2. Mehr Publishing group:
    http://www.mehrpublishing.com

  7. baphilinia says:

    Thanks a lot. This is really helpful.

  8. Warren Raye says:

    Disclaimer: I am a current employee of Edanz.

    I wanted to thank Jeffrey Beall for including Edanz’s Journal Selector in his blog post. At Edanz, we realized that researchers were after a tool like this as we receive many queries each week about the ‘best’ place to submit manuscripts we have edited for clients; that is why we developed our paid-for Journal Selection service in conjunction with our free Journal Selector tool.

    Our paid-for Journal Selection service, described in detail here:
    http://www.edanzediting.com/services/journal_selection

    It is completed by one of our native English-speaking editors and offers a client a list of 4 potential journals and an explanation of why we think the journal is an appropriate choice. You can find a sample Journal Recommendations Report here:
    http://www.edanzediting.com/sites/all/files/Journal_Recommendations_Report_Sample_Global.pdf

    A sample explanatory letter that accompanies each report here:
    http://www.edanzediting.com/sites/all/files/Sample_Journal_Recommendations_Cover_Letter_1.pdf

    Of course, using the free Journal Selector widget we developed, a user is likely to receive a lot more journal ‘hits’ but they will not receive an explanation of the ins and outs, or pros and cons, of targeting one journal over another.

    When we eventually released the Journal Selector tool, we decided to make it available to ALL researchers for free. It was something we worked on for quite some time, and are soon to launch an updated version that is much more powerful and user friendly.

    Best,

    Warren Raye, PhD
    Chief Scientific Advisor
    Edanz Group Ltd.

    China http://www.liwenbianji.cn/
    Global http://www.edanzediting.com/
    Japan http://www.edanzediting.co.jp/

    • bill says:

      Well, I just tried out the free version of Edanz with an interdisciplinary paper I have been having some difficulty in finding an outlet for. Among a number of inappropriate responses it did present a journal I had not come across previously, which does have a legitimate IF and looks like it could be a good fit.
      I’m impressed!
      Thanks Jeffrey and Warren.

  9. malay sahs says:

    Journals with what impact factor gets due credit in competitive exams?How good the `researchscholarjournal’ is?

  10. Trapti says:

    Thanks for the list. Also there are a few more mentioned below :-

    1. http;//ijact.in

  11. […] Original source: Need help finding a good journal for your next paper? try these resources […]

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