Two New Absurd OA Journals, Two New OA Mandates

KnowledgeCuddle .... Really?

KnowledgeCuddle …. Really?

This past week I added a publisher called KnowledgeCuddle Publication to my list. The publisher’s name is silly and unprofessional, more evidence of scholarly open-access publishing’s decline into absurdity.

At the same time, two U.S. universities implemented strong open-access policies, policies their faculties will be pressured to follow and submit to.

The contrast is stark: the appearance of a completely ridiculous open-access publisher, and the appearance of what are essentially open-access mandates at two U.S. universities. Why are universities promoting and essentially mandating a publishing model that is increasingly becoming a self-parody?

KnowledgeCuddle 2

A product of the open-access movement.

KnowledgeCuddle Publication uses the open-source Open Journal Systems software, a favorite of predatory publishers.

Based in Gujarat, India, KnowledgeCuddle currently publishes two open-access journals:

  • International Journal of Research in Advance [sic] Engineering
  • International Journal of Computer Engineering and Sciences

The two journals cover academic disciplines already saturated with open-access journals — both are completely unneeded.

The two universities that announced their new open-access policies are the University of Arizona and Florida State University. Now faculty at the two universities can publish in either of the two KnowledgeCuddle journals and be in compliance of their university’s open-access policy, provided they also submit a post-print of their work to their library’s repository.

The policies only specify open-access and don’t address journal quality, a big problem with OA journals.

Over the past couple weeks, some library email lists I monitor have been inundated with congratulatory messages directed at the two universities. I think this is an example of what anthropologist Michael F. Brown calls open-access triumphalism.

I oppose open-access mandates as a violation of academic freedom. Fortunately, both universities’ policies provide easy escape clauses from the Orwellian policies.

Still, I think the appearance of publishers such as KnowledgeCuddle, together with the tacit approval of such publishers by academic librarians and others is cause for worry.

Where KnowledgeCuddle claims its journals are indexed. http://www.knowledgecuddle.com/index.php/IJCES

Where KnowledgeCuddle claims its journals are indexed. http://www.knowledgecuddle.com/index.php/IJCES

21 Responses to Two New Absurd OA Journals, Two New OA Mandates

  1. Mani Maria says:

    Nowadays Indexing is easier, every publisher is mentioning in their website that we are indexed in so and so. Do we really believe indexed journals are maintaining the standards?

  2. Robert Cameron says:

    What two US universities do has no immediate impact on me (retired, and publishing for my discipline, and for the advancement of my worthy co-authors). But this trend for mandating is a real threat to those of us, perhaps more in the humanities than in the sciences like me, who rely on our enthusiasm and past experience to write stuff which is of interest and use to others, but have no source of funds other than our pensions to pay for publication. There are OA journals (perhaps dependent on public funding) that maintain traditional standards of rigor while avoiding author charges. There are not many, and i guess they will diminish.
    The attention naturally focuses on areas like engineering and medicine where the competition and need to publish is greatest. spare a thought, you mandaters, for those of us in specialist fields with no immediate economic returns. do you really want the supply of insightful science to dry up unless it is publicly-funded?

  3. Anonymous says:

    How could OASPA associated with it???

  4. Daryl Grenz says:

    It seems a tad disingenuous to suggest that institutional open access policies encourage researchers to publish in low-quality OA journals, the policies are pretty explicitly crafted not to interfere with researchers choice of publication outlet, whether OA or subscription or some combination of the two.

    • Marco says:

      Price.

      Consider the word carefully. If you expect to publish ten papers, the average respectable OA publisher will take 10,000 to 20,000 dollars away from your budget – in just one year. That’s a very large amount of your funding!

      • Daryl Grenz says:

        What does price or OA publishers have to do with institutional open access policies? Part of the point of institutional open access is for researchers and organizations to be able to provide more access to their research without having to pay publishers additional fees.

  5. lenandlar says:

    Is there also a list of not so credible non OA journals and publishers?

  6. S Arunachalam says:

    Open Journal Systems is a free software. The creators of the software have no control over publishers. Do you have control over the English language? Will you say that these journals are published in English language as most predatory journals are? I can use Linux and Ubuntu the same way too for good and bad. So, please do not bring disrepute to OJS by associating it with poor quality journals.
    Arun

    • MC says:

      I fail to see how Mr. Beall has brought a bad reputation to a piece of software. Those who run the fake journals have used the software. The software is now associated with fake journals, because someone used it for that purpose. This is a fact and your argument is backwards.

      And no, these OA journals are most frequently *not* published in English, I assure you. I, and others here, including Mr. Beall, do have control over the English language. Thank you for clarifying that.

  7. Dr. Maan AlSalihi says:

    Hi
    I am a specialist entomology and biological control
    I want to publish search in specialized and a global Journal with a high impact factor and requests a small amount not to exceed $ 100 for publication
    I hope you send more than one journal
    Best Regards
    Dr. Maan Al-Salihi

  8. rehab rahem says:

    excus me can you help me if Academic Publishing House Researcher journal is found in black list or not

  9. DrMe says:

    HI Dr. Beall,
    What’s your view on TAKAYAMA Publishing Group? They also organize meetings, proceeding of which are published in their journals. They seem to be a Japanese company operating is France. Their “about us” page is blank.
    Thanks.
    Dr.M

    • I find it highly questionable. I think this publisher meets the criteria for inclusion on my list, so I’ve added it. Thanks for alerting me to it. Most definitely, don’t send any of your work to any of their journals. It appears they created a pretend scholarly society for each of their journals.

  10. SM says:

    If I’m not mistaken, aren’t some universities adopting open access policies in order to enable deposition of articles from print journals into repositories after an embargo period? (Not necessarily just to force people to only submit to OA journals.) I think work funded by certain US agencies already has that ability for deposition of work put into (some?) subscription journals, but work not funded by those agencies could be depositable based on certain journals’ policies IF the institution has a policy requiring open access. My school has an OA mandate that can be opted out of quite simply, but that I think is there to facilitate deposition into public repositories.

  11. The journals are getting more and more ridiculous each day and the volume of spam seems to be increasing steadily. I’ve recently started maintaining a list of blocked domains within my email client. I wonder if this is something worth sharing on your site as an addendum to “Beall’s list”. I only started doing this recently, so my list is pretty short (see below), but I know we can make it pretty comprehensive using your list of publishers.

    @conferenceseries.net, @omicsgroup.com, @ommegaonline.com, @excelyticspublishers.info, @peertechz.net, @omicsonline.org

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